Breaking the Silence: My Personal Experience with Porn Addiction

Tonight, I would like to discuss porn and the effects that addiction has had on my life. First, it might be a good time to say this: addiction is defined in Webster’s as “a strong and harmful need to regularly have something (such as a drug) or do something (such as gamble).” Porn is an addiction because, as I found out, it is not something that one can just view once and walk away from. It becomes a “drug” so to speak, that consumes the thoughts of those addicted to it. It becomes a need. For the longest time, it too was one of my needs.

I know that I will be accused of standing on a soapbox if I don’t say this, so please, hear me out. Read the words I am writing fully before making a judgment. I started out watching porn when I was 16. This was before I became addicted to cigarettes, before I became an alcoholic, before I found myself addicted to prescription medications. With the advent of high-speed internet, the availability of porn skyrocketed. For a young man with no solid foundation in Christ, I quickly progressed from simple pictures of women to hardcore videos of people doing things that I wouldn’t allow my future children to bear witness to.

I have been through failed relationship after failed relationship in the past. Not because of the porn itself, but because of the insecurities that are felt by the other person when they see your eyes wandering. Would you want to subject someone else to that?

The problem is that porn is such a subtle addiction that it isn’t something we readily identify as such until we find ourselves more interested in the media that is slowly destroying our moral foundation than having a real-life partner to share our lives with. I too found myself going down this path, without a moral compass to guide me.

I have made several irresponsible choices in my life. I believe that porn, because it is now considered normal and even acceptable in much of today’s society, has played a part in encouraging high-risk and downright immoral behavior from today’s teens. Many people see porn addiction as a victimless problem, therefore becoming the elephant in the room. It isn’t hurting anyone, so why discuss it?

Well, I was more concerned with viewing porn than with acting responsibly. I cared more about the images on my computer screen than the school project that was assigned two weeks ago and was now due the next day. Does that sound victimless?

I would like to end with this thought.

The internet is a vast collection of computers networked together. Believe it or not, the only 2 signals understood by a computer are ON and OFF. It is the sequence of these two signals that determines how software will act, how data will be stored, how input will be converted into data. Sometimes, a malicious programmer will align these signals into a sequence that corrupts data, “infects” other parts of the system, spreads to other computers and eventually destroys “good” data contained within them. Antivirus programs work to prevent an infection before it begins.

Luckily, people are not like computers. We have free will and nothing of this world can change that. However, we are easily infected by the virus of moral corruption. I firmly believe that a strong parental base of moral integrity, discipline, biblical teachings and family values acts like an antivirus program for people, preventing and correcting moral corruption before it becomes a powerful virus that infects and corrupts every aspect of our lives and destroys the lives of our loved ones. In addition, these teachings also help us to forge strong, healthy interpersonal relationships. Does Windows do that?

About Mike

I am the owner of OneCross.net and the administrator of TeenGirlsForGod.net.

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